In addition to the Statute and Rules of Procedure of the Court of Justice, other legal documents have been adopted by the Court of Justice or the United Nations or concluded by the Court with the host country governing certain aspects of the Court`s activities. Basic Documents in International Law summarizes all the important documents necessary for the study of international law. Compiled by Ian Brownlie, a global expert in the field, this book has provided students and practitioners with the key tools that provide an in-depth foundation in this diverse and fascinating area of law. This sixth edition contains all important new documents in this area since the publication of the fifth edition in 2002, including the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Since the first edition in 1967, this collection of basic texts has become an established aid both for the practising lawyer who uses documents on international law and for the student of international law in addition to existing course manuals. As the title suggests, the collection`s goal has always been to provide readers with the essential and basic materials, and this issue continues to do so, building on the goals and reputation built over the past 40 years. late Ian Brownlie, Q.C., lawyer at Blackstone Chambers, London, Chichele Professor of International Law, University of Oxford (emeritus), former member and Chair of the International Law Commission. The Charter of the United Nations, signed in San Francisco on June 26, 1945, is the founding treaty of the United Nations. It is also the constituent text of the International Court of Justice created by the Charter. Haidi Willmot, Ralph Mamiya, Scott Sheeran, Marc Weller. Denis Barry, Edward Jenkins QC, Charlene Sumnall, Ben Douglas-Jones, Daniel Lloyd. Article 30 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice provides that “the Court shall establish rules for the exercise of its functions”. These rules are intended to supplement the general rules laid down in the statutes and to contain detailed provisions on the measures to be taken to comply with them.

The Statute of the International Court of Justice is annexed to, and forms an integral part of, the Charter of the United Nations. The main objective of the Statute is to organise the composition and functioning of the Court of Justice. The provisions relating to the Court of Justice are set out in Articles 7(1), 36(3) and 92 to 96 (Chapter XIV) of the Charter. Like the Charter, the Statute can only be amended by a two-thirds majority of the General Assembly and ratified by two-thirds of States (art. 69). If the ICJ wishes to amend its Statute, it must submit a proposal to the General Assembly by sending a written opinion to the Secretary-General of the United Nations (art. 70). So far, however, the Statute of the Court of Justice has never been changed. Cedric Ryngaert, Ige F Dekker, Ramses A Wessel, Jan Wouters In October 2001, the Court adopted its first procedural instructions to the States that appeared before it. Practice directions complement rather than modify the rules of the tribunal. They reflect the ongoing review of the Court`s working methods. Once adopted by the Court of Justice, the amendments to the procedural instructions will be published on the Court`s website and published in the Court`s directory, with temporal reservations as to their noted applicability.

This text is published by the Higher Education Division of the OUP Since October 2001, the Court has also issued practical instructions to States appearing before it. The International Court of Justice was established by the Charter of the United Nations, which provides that all States Members of the United Nations are ipso facto parties to the Statute of the Court. The Statute and the Rules of Procedure of the Court of Justice govern the composition and functioning of the Court of Justice. on the principle of non-discrimination In Part VII – The Law of Treaties 1:Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties Part VIII – State responsibility 2:Article on State responsibility for acts contrary to international law Part IX – Judicial settlement of disputes 1:Statute of the International Court of Justice, Part X – International criminal law 1: Statute of the International Criminal Court 1:Statute of the International Criminal Court for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991 2:Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.